Saturday, August 12, 2017

My Garden is Making Me Rich

There was this whole thing a while back where some person published an article about a $200 tomato or some shit.  The goal, I guess, was to debunk the idea that growing one's own food saves money.  I guess saving money wasn't part of the author's experience.

The problem is that it's not true.  Having a garden DOES save money.  I didn't read the above mentioned article.  Probably if I want to criticize it, I should, but the fact - at least MY personal, decade's long, experience is that my garden does save money.

Take cucumbers, for instance.  We are at the very beginning of harvest season for cukes here in southern Maine.  They're just starting to come up.

I bought cucumber plants this year.  We need to work on a greenhouse or cold frame so that I can start plants.  It will have to come after the house stuff is done, but I'm pretty sure we can do it, mostly, for free.

The plants were $2.50 for a six pack.  I planted them with my broccoli and planned this really awesome trellis thing, that I never got around to making.  So, my cucumbers are growing along the ground.  No worries, because the broccoli is mostly done.  I'm letting some of the plants go to seed, so that I can save it for next year.

Something ate half the plants.  So, I have three.

I have a pound of pickling-sized cukes on my counter  that I harvested yesterday.  I've harvested at least that much again over the past week or two, and when it gets full into growing this month (August is the huge harvest month here), I'll have enough for both eating and making a gallon or two of sour pickles.

Pickling cucumbers sell for $0.50/lb around here.  I need 3 pounds to make a gallon of pickles.  That's $1.50 for a gallon.  I spent $2.50 on plants.  I only have to harvest 5 lbs of cucumbers (which is about 15 little cukes) to break even.  I only have to harvest 6 lbs to make money.

I don't know what that author was doing to make his garden cost so much money, but here's my reality:

I've planted apples, peaches, hazelnut, a chef's fantasy of a perennial herb garden, blueberries, grapes. and raspberries.  The initial outlay for some of those plants was a little high (like the apple tree that was $35), but these things, my perennial garden, are an investment, that over time, pays for itself.  The rest of the garden is the same.

I paid $3 per pound for seed potato.  A pound of seed potatoes is about 3 medium sized potatoes.  Each seed can be cut into three or more pieces, depending on the number of eyes (I've gotten five pieces before from one fist-sized potato).  Each piece will yield between 3 lbs and 5 lbs of potatoes (or more depending on the size of the potatoes at harvest and the growing technique).  So, if I cut a seed potato into three pieces, and each piece give me 5 lbs of potatoes, that's 15 lbs for $1.   That works out to something like $0.07 per pound, as opposed to $0.79/lb for Maine-grown potatoes at the grocery store - or $2 per pound for Maine-grown potatoes at the farm stand.

There's all of that, but also, I just went outside to pick the blueberries that were ripe right outside my door, and I found a dime in front of the blueberry bush.

So, I guess my garden is, literally, making me richer, too :).  


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