Saturday, August 12, 2017

Twenty-one Days until TEOTWAWKI - Day 3 (Fire ...?)

Deus Ex Machina: "Tom called."

Me:  "Yeah?  Is everything okay?"

Deus Ex Machina:  "Yep.  He has some wood.  He's says it's about two cords*.  We can have it, if we pick it up."

That's a fairly common conversation in our house. We are blessed with many friends and family members who will think of us when there is firewood available.  Most folks know that we heat with wood.

It's actually a point of pride that we haven't had an oil delivery since 2008 - the year we had our Lopi wood stove installed.  We've heated our house with wood since then.

Having the wood stove isn't really a new prep.  We already have it, but storing up wood is an every year project.  We were given two cords of wood this summer, after the lay-off, and it was a huge relief.  We have know a landowner who will allow us to harvest dead wood and downed trees, but it's a lot more work than those two cords.  We'll start working on the wood pile in a few weeks, when things cool off a bit.  By winter, we should have what we need to last until next April or May.

It is an on-going project - not a one day thing, but honestly, it only took us a few hours to decide on exactly the wood stove we wanted, to find a local dealer, and to call and order it (back in 2008).  If we hadn't already made that prep, before Deus Ex Machina's job loss, we might be looking at a very different kind of winter, because filling up the oil tank (AND running the furnace, which is forced hot air, and requires electricity ... a LOT of electricity), is probably not in the budget.

To that end, if you're looking at a possible financial hiccup, start planning now for that eventuality.   Like I said to Deus Ex Machina, we've been planning for this for ten years.  That wood stove will keep us warm, this winter, just like the last ten, without requiring that we spend a dime.

I'd also like to share our other, semi-related, prep.

A few years ago, I was an SUV driver.  Then, we tried to get a sticker on our old girl, but her belly was a bit rusty.  She sat in the driveway for a very long time.  We used her for storing the boxsprings to our bed when we moved our bed out of the back room and into the office to start the renovation.  Finally, we found a junkyard that would buy her for parts.

We used to haul wood with the SUV.  In fact, we always, kind of, treated that vehicle like it was a truck ... with a cover.  We hauled a lot of stuff in that thing.  Our other car was a Honda Civic.  One can not haul much wood in a Honda Civic.

We spent several months with just one car, but then, Deus Ex Machina found a used Toyota truck. We bought it.

Having that truck has been invaluable.  We can take our chickens to the butcher (can't imagine trying to haul 12 full-grown meat chickens in the back seat of my car).  We can haul wood.  We can take advantage of "free" stuff on the side of the road.  We can buy an Armoire secondhand and not worry about how we'll get it home.

The truck does not get very good gas mileage, but it's real value is the independence it gives us with regard to acquiring things we need to support our lifestyle.   In just the cost of cord wood, it will pay for itself before we have to call the junkyard to tow it away.

And keeping the home fires burning is priceless.



*We use between 5 and 7 cords of wood, depending on how well it is seasoned and the type of wood.  Pine burns hotter and faster, and so we'd need more of it to get through the winter.  The wood mentioned above was pine.  It will be nice for those early fires where we just want to take the edge off, but we don't need a fire all day.

1 comment:

  1. Good deal, for free! I've been trying to convince hubby to get a woodstove for years, but our gas furnace is affordable and we never lose power here. I joked and told him if he dies first the first purchase will be a nice woodstove :)

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