Friday, August 18, 2017

Twenty-One Days Until TEOTWAWKI - Safe Food??

This past week ended up being much busier than anticipated, and there was little time to hop on the computer and work out a blog post.

The goal was to blog each day things that we're doing to prep for our personal end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it, which for us is a job loss with no income starting around the beginning of September.

The thing for us is that we've become accustomed to having a certain level of income, and so anything less than that level (especially when that "less" is zero) is a hardship. 

We've been trying to combat that financial hardship by making other-than-normal lifestyle choices.  Over the past week and a half, I've talked about a few of the things we've done, using my book as a guide. 

I left off with Day 5, which was one of the three "food" days I wrote about in my book.  It's not that food is so much more important than other TEOTWAWKI topics, but ... well, you know in those post-apocalyptic stories, there is always one group of cannibals.  Always. 

And it blows my mind at how easy it is for those fictitious characters to choose that option.  There is, simply, so much food available.  The problem is that there is so much that is not considered food.

I've mentioned the Non-Consumer Advocate FB group that I'm on.  There are 40,000 members on the group, and so there are some pretty interesting discussions.  The other day, someone mentioned that she'd found some feral blackberry brambles when she was filling up her gas tank and wondered if they were "safe."

Deus Ex Machina and I co-authored a book called Browsing Nature's Aisles: A Year of Foraging for Wild Foods in the Suburbs in which we take readers on our journey of discovering what there is to eat in our neighborhood.  Not only did we spend that year long project finding all sorts of wild sustenance, but we also hosted a party at the end of that year where we served our "wild foods."  Some of our friends even foraged some of their own foods, which they shared at our party.

The following summer, Deus Ex Machina and I challenged ourselves to a "Foraging Sundays" challenge - the goal being to eat only what we could forage for the whole day.  It was actually tough, because, as would be expected, we had to live our lives, which included my working on most Sundays, our volunteer work at the theater, and a trip out-of-town in the middle of that project, which meant we weren't always able to spend a couple of hours out foraging followed by half a day in the kitchen processing acorns - or other wild foods (most wild food isn't the pick-and-eat convenience food that berries are). 

We ate some awesome food (including periwinkles steamed in a foraged-peach wine and butter - so good!).  We also had some hungry days.  My favorite meal was the nettles soup, which was mostly just nettles cooked in water with some butter and other seasonings added for flavor. 

As we mention in our book, it's interesting, but also sad, that people are more comfortable with the GMO and pesticide-laden food they pay for at the grocery store than they are with what they find wild.  For instance, in the above mentioned thread about the blackberries, the original poster wanted to know if the blackberries were "safe" to eat. 

Most people who responded said they were ... and they are.  At least they are as safe to eat as any conventionally grown food we buy at the grocery store.  Actually, probably safer, as those wild blackberries were probably not sprayed with anything, and it's just the proximity to the gasoline filling station that was her concern. 

Deus Ex Machina and I went for a walk with the dogs the other day.  He brought home a bagful of wild hazelnuts, which we will dry, hull, shell, roast and enjoy. 

During our Foraging Sundays, roasted hazelnuts featured prominently in our diet.  We made the tastiest and most satisfying trail mix with the hazelnuts and some dried blueberries. 

We have a well stocked pantry and freezer.  We could probably get by with a couple of months worth of Pantry Challenges without going hungry, although our meals might end up being boring, or lacking some of the usual sides or condiments that we enjoy, like we might have "chicken tacos", but we wouldn't have cheese or avocado or sour cream ... or tortilla chips.  Instead, the meal might be something like spicy shredded chicken with Buckwheat cornbread and homemade salsa.  It would be less exciting than we are accustomed to, but we wouldn't be hungry. 

In addition, our garden is starting to produce.  We still have lots of tomatoes and peppers to look forward to in the coming weeks.  The grapes and apples, which look pretty generous this year, haven't fully ripened, and the potatoes and carrots aren't quite ready to pull, yet. 

In short, lots of food just waiting to be harvested. 

And there are lots of wild options out there, still, too.  Deus Ex Machina is eager to get out and look for mushrooms.  After today's rain, the mushrooms are likely to be popping.  Adding dried or frozen mushrooms to winter stews is wonderful.

There was another awesome find that I wanted to share. 

If we end up in a true TSHTF scenario, and we're unable to pay our bills and things like the electricity and water get cut off, we have options.

I was excited to find this public water fountain right within biking distance of my house.  Clean, drinkable water.  I could ride my bike over there, fill up some jugs, and head home in less than a half hour.  The crate on my bike will hold four gallons.  If I bring the bike trailer, too, I could get almost a week's worth of drinking water for my family in one trip.   


In addition, after I canned my peaches the other day, the jars sat on the counter cooling, and I mentioned to Deus Ex Machina that we need a place to store all of this awesome food I'm canning.  "Hint!  Hint!"  I was trying to say.  "There's no room in our pantry for more stuff, and we (and by we, I mean you) need to build more shelves." 

Ever the skeptic, he started looking at what was on the pantry shelves and found several quart jars of just water*.  I've probably mentioned before that I will fill my canner every time.  Sometimes, if I'm canning small batches, I'll add jars of water.  We, probably, have a couple of gallons of water in sealed jars. 

*We moved the water to a different cabinet where I have more water stored and put the peaches in its place.  Now, we don't need more shelves ... until I can something else, or decide that the corn should be in the pantry rather than on the counter ;).

For other water needs, we still have our rain barrels, which will hopefully be full this time tomorrow.

We're probably good for food and water for a while, but the saga of our TEOTWAWKI continues ....

3 comments:

  1. I've foraged mussels on the coast and berries too. It's easy not to see those things, and great with the free water pump!

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  2. I have been reading your blog since 2009. I never planned to have kids but circumstances change. I have an almost 3yo and am very interested in your unschooling methods. Where do you find the information for it, or do you have some links? Can't do public education in the current environment of lunacy so any advice would be helpful. I am in Eugene, Oregon. The eclipse carpocolypse never happened, the media scared everyone to not venture out...but on the other hand, everyone stocked up on food and gas beforehand cause we did have shortages last week. shipping@oregonsonlyorganics.net

    yes I make and sell organic fertilizer for a living and am willing to make trades for education information even thought I am on the other side of the country :;

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    Replies
    1. If you're on Facebook, check out this group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/UnschoolingMom2Mom/). There's a lot of information about unschooling.

      There were two parts to our finding unschooling. The first was our general parenting style, which was modeled after Dr. Sears "attachment parenting." Unschooling is actually a pretty natural extension of how we parented.

      The second was reading Mary Griffith's, Unschooling Handbook. (http://amzn.to/2vXZIiQ **This link is to the book on Amazon, and it is a sponsored link - that is, if you use the link to purchase the book, I'll get a commission, but don't feel you need to purchase the book. Your library probably has a copy).

      The biggest hurdle to unschooling is trusting that your child will learn what he/she needs to learn without a bunch of "lessons", but I promise, it happens. It really does. Your job as the parent is to provide a safe and interactive environment with lots of very cool things for your child to explore. Books, especially.

      Also understand that "unschooling" is not "UNteaching." The basic premise of unschooling is to allow your child to fully and freely explore the world, and to be there to answer questions and provide resources. My always unschooled (now adult) daughter used to ask for some crazy things, like a college-level science textbook about sharks. Yes, it was a textbook, but SHE asked for it, and we got it for her.

      The bottom line is to do what feels right and good for your family ... and especially, now, while your baby is still young, to just really have a lot of fun and enjoy the process. Your baby is learning a ton of stuff right now, and none of it is sitting-at-a-table rote exercises. The rest of his/her education can be exactly like that, and he/she will learn everything he/she needs to know to get through life - even if "life" includes future academic pursuits, like college.

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